Andi Suandi
Andi Suandi
Andi Suandi

There is no reference in reading Andi Suandi’s artworks since he places painting as the free entity.

Canvasses in black and white are neatly plastered in white-colored room in Cemara 6 Gallery. White abstract paintings are plastered at the left side, whilst the black colored one are displayed at the right side. The black colored paintings are void of any object, save for contrastive red or white lines.

The black and white colors do not form a specific object other than an imperfect curves or distorted lines. The minor colors amidst the dominant black contort a dynamic on the canvas. The black color does not overtake the entire canvas, since the minor-colored lines crisscrossing on it.

So does the paintings in white. The dominant white color is split in various halves due to lines or strokes in non-white colors. The painting itself pictures a dominant white color, with brushes of gold, yellow or mixture of both in between. There is no definite object except fused lines or an islet of minor color in a sheet of white canvas.

Andi Suandi, Peziarah #11, 140x140cm, 2013
Andi Suandi, Peziarah #11, 140x140cm, 2013

The artist does not paint once in a white color. The 18 paintings made in 2013 were previously made in various colored, shapeless strokes. These strokes were then covered with black or white color. This in turn made the previous colored brushstrokes disappear beneath the latter color. The leftover, uncovered colors are the dynamic of the canvas.

This poetic moment thus turns into the main purpose of Andi Suandi’s canvasses. Andi’s art enthusiasts communicate by receiving contrast of major and minor colors on his canvas. This appreciation reaches its peak in the mixture of the color’s contrast.

Let’s take a look at the painting titled Peziarah #1 (Pilgrim #1). The canvas of this artwork is divided into two panels, summed up to be 180×215 cm and made with acrylic. The artwork offers silence in the dark color on the left side that is marred by a minor, faded yellow color, and the white line crossing the same part of the canvas. The dark ambience of the painting felt dynamic, not absolute, with a tinge of tone emitting from the canvas.

This method is also used in the painting titled Peziarah #8 (Pilgrim #8) whose size is 140×140 cm. The red line is not the leftover of dark color strokes but it is made on the black canvas. The line is not completely straight so there is no rigidity visible on the canvas.

The result is a line similar to that of skyline or horizon on the sky. The different thing is that the horizon or the skyline is unidentifiable to those that happen in the morning or in the evening at the beach. We may never know the name, but Andi manages to communicate through the canvas to the audiences. It is probable that the feeling of the situation is what we called a poetic moment.

Suasana Pameran Peziarah karya Andi Suandi di Galeri Cemara 6
Suasana Pameran Peziarah karya Andi Suandi di Galeri Cemara 6

This poetic moment does not actually exist on the canvas. Though so, his reflection is not limited to contrastive colors and lines. The poetic moment can be traced through his poems. Along with his solo exhibition themed Pilgrims in Cemara 6 Gallery, Central Jakarta, he launches his poem anthology with the same theme with sub-title “The light walker that shall goes beyond time and space due to His desire”. The poems are all titled Peziarah #1 to #160.

The poems are separated contents to “fill” Andi Suandi’s paintings, even if it has never been intended for the poems and paintings to be two in an entity. Those two artworks are still two separate entities, to be enjoyed separately, but at the same times it is may be enjoyed as one that presuppose another.

Behind the façade of his artworks, Andi Suandi has been an avid friend of spiritual teachings of Sunan Bonang, Ranggawarsito, Syekh Siti Jenar, Sunan Kalijaga, and he is also familiar with the spiritual walker, Al Halaz. He admits that he absorbs the thoughts and teachings of these saints.

If these saints channel their thoughts into teachings and conduct, Andi sublimes these into canvasses of abstract paintings. Not as forms or statements obviously, but a poetic moment that is personally raised through communication of contrastive majors and minors on canvas.

Why “communicating”? That may be because there is no communication in abstract paintings. The same thing applies to the artworks of Andi Suandi, stated Chandra Johan as the curator. An artwork of Andi Suandi is not only the painting, but also the process of reflecting on it. There is no referral outside the canvas in helping the reading of his artworks.

“Andi’s paintings are closer to an original proverb, ‘that painting itself a reality’, out of the context if it is “readable” or not. In actuality, he does not explain his paintings one by one, since he himself is a world of paintings. Isn’t that the peak of proverb “that painting itself a reality” returns to the origin of the pictures?” said Chandra Johan.

Enjoy!!